Wholehearted

Finding Quiet

Ahh...Spring. We thought you were here. But, alas, not quite yet. 

Can you believe this weather we are experiencing in New England? This Oklahoma girl certainly cannot, and as anxious as I am to get into the beautiful spring and summer days - I remember something.

The sleepy days of winter often turn into crazy, busy days of Spring. Finishing the school year, starting spring sports, running errands, fun activities, church calendar amps up, and things can quickly turn very hectic.

Take a moment and prepare yourself. If we work preventably, maybe it won't catch us by surprise and run us down. 

Learning the art of regular silence and solitude can help us regulate our schedules, move towards wholeness and peace. 

So try this. Close your eyes. Turn off all noise and set the phone aside. Be alone. Then make a guess how long you sat there. 2 minutes, 5 minutes? I can guarantee you it was more like 30 seconds that felt like 2 minutes.

Silence and solitude are two spiritual disciplines that bring vitality and life to our relationship with God. Much fruit can be born from these disciplines, yet they are probably some of the most neglected in Christian faith.

Our spirits are suffering from too much noise and not enough rest, moreover, our souls are literally crushed under the weight of our inability to stop and be silent.

We don’t like to be still and what do they say about silence? Right, it’s deafening.

There is a definition of silence and solitude found in Emotionally Healthy Spirituality by Peter Scazzero that fits the context of these two things as spiritual disciplines.

Solitude is the practice of being absent from people and things to attend to God.

Silence is the practice of quieting every inner and outer voice to attend to God.

I began awhile back  incorporating these disciplines into my week and schedule, and I am still working to incorporate them regularly into each of days. I am getting better. However, it is super hard. I sat at the park this morning and had such a difficulty focusing. My thoughts kept leading me astray. I finally turned my music off, closed my eyes, and finally a few minutes later I  was able to shut everything out. And I began to find my way. The way to Him - my God who offers sweet peace to our frazzled minds.

For thus said the Lord GOD, the Holy One of Israel, “In returning and rest you shall be saved; in quietness and in trust shall be your strength.” But you were unwilling, Is. 30:15

I know there have been many times I was simply unwillingly. And it wasn't too long ago that I could barely stand to sit still or quiet unless I was sleeping or reading. To sit completely still with nothing in my hands, it's difficult. To turn off all noise until the "silence is deafening" is not a simple task. Yet, I don't want to miss out on the salvation and strength of my God.

There are a great many benefits in these disciplines of silence and solitude.

John Piper states: One benefit of silence is simply searching the depths of our own souls, asking what our blind spots have become in the rush of everyday life. In the busyness, is there anything important I’m neglecting or repressing? How am I doing in my various roles? What needs refocusing?

Yet, these are the very questions that tend to be the reason we don’t. It is quite difficult for many of us to be still, let alone be silent. If and when we finally do stop and sit still, we need music, we even need the noise of our racing thoughts.

There was a time in my life long ago (much before kids), I would turn on the TV simply for the noise of it. I think sometimes we are afraid if it is too silent then we will no longer be able to drown out our fears, disappointments, and worries. Those things we most want to avoid will become a deafening noise to our ears. Our instinctive response is to protect ourselves by shutting it out and shutting it down. And how best to do this by avoiding solitude and silence? Yet, we need to run headlong into these difficult things. Acknowledge them and bring them to Christ, because that is where healing begins.

Before I begin to implement this discipline, I was often never alone. I had three children, a husband, ministry responsibilities and more. And, although, it can be wonderful to be surrounded by people all of the time - it is not healthy and does nothing to help you grow. We all need moments, several moments, throughout our days where we - like Christ - pull away from the crowd and pray.

But Jesus Himself would often slip away to the wilderness and pray. Luke 5:16

Many of us are not willing to stop long enough for God to speak. He longs to cut through the noise of our lives. We need to just stop. Put the phones down, set the laptops aside, let the home projects be for a bit, walk away from the people, and STOP. Step away, be replenished and find rest.

After many years of working to implement this discipline, I suffer greatly if I neglect it. I have been in a longer season of recent months where I neglected this time, and I saw an increase in my anxiety and ongoing feelings of disconnect and chaos. I am working to get back in this rhythm. 

Most importantly, when silence and solitude are incorporated disciplines that are centered on our Father - deep intimacy is formed with Christ and our lives bear much fruit when regularly abiding in Him. We become rooted, established in Him. Which offers the sustaining grace we so desperately need to love God and others well.

We should approach the disciplines of silence and solitude as rhythms in our day, rather a specific formulaic moment we carve out. These rhythms should be a soft balance of intentionality paired with creativity. A rhythm insinuates a depth of feeling, pattern, and consistency. In the rhythms of silence and solitude, the intentionality offers consistency and discipline - while creativity allows us to approach God in regular moments throughout our day rather than “getting our fill” at one time - just hoping it will last through the day. If we are walking deeply in Christ, we have intentional and planned moments with Christ - then there are these beautiful spontaneous moments throughout the day when we stop and feel the rhythm of His heartbeat. We sense we just need a moment with our Creator. We rest and we are quiet.

The disciplines of silence and solitude cannot and should not replace our regular times of focused and centered prayer. Or the regular study and meditation of His Word. They act in supplement to these ever important disciplines that should be a regular part of our week.

May it become a natural rhythm that flows out of a deep desire to know God more, to hear more from Him, and to bare more of our soul to Him. 

It cannot be a matter of adding another item on our to do list or a ritual we factor into our schedules. The very act of solitude and silence speaks to surrender. It declares a longing to abide with the Father, to stop all actions and noise and listen and be WITH God. Therefore, it must be an overflow of the inner work of Christ in one’s life. The more He works in me, the more space he fills in my heart, and the more I want and need to be with Him.

How do we practically implement this into our day? Peter Scazzero in Emotionally Healthy Spirituality discusses these disciplines, and offers great suggestions. Richard Foster's Celebration of Discipline is another good one. There are many resources out there, but ultimately you must pray and ask God to give you wisdom in how He will lead you. He made you, created you - He knows what will speak most to you, what will be the most life-giving. It will change with the seasons, it will founded in who you are and what God knows is best for you. But, He will be faithful to give you your own road map.

And remember, as Scazzero states, “The purpose of these disciplines is to remember God and commune with him all through our days.”

How can I be filled with more of God - more of His Spirit? Simple, by making more room in my heart for Him to dwell. Centering my life around Him, regularly surrendering my soul, setting my mind upon Him, inviting Him into each part of my day - this makes room for Him to dwell in me.

 ...written by Christan Causey

...written by Christan Causey

The Art of Wholehearted

The battle lies in the division of who we are privately and who we are publically. As much as we desire to be wholly undivided, most of humanity will be drawn into division. It's part of our nature. Yet, in Christ - fragmentation, this brokenness can be mended into a beautiful wholeness. It's only possible with Christ in us.

Wholehearted. What does it mean to be wholehearted?

Merriam-Webster would define this term as “completely and sincerely devoted, determined, or enthusiastic…marked by complete and earnest commitment…free from all reserve or hesitation.”

Over the last several years, I have learned and studied wholeheartedness. I have looked at it from the perspective of qualified authors, Spirit-led counseling, and - mostly importantly - from the Word of God and trying to learn the heart of our Father.

I like Merriam-Webster’s definition, but I feel it’s missing the context of Scripture. Scriptures come to mind such as Luke 10:27 - “Love the Lord with all your heart, soul, and strength - love your neighbor as yourself” and 1 These. 5:23 - “Now may the God of peace himself sanctify you completely, and may your whole spirit and soul and body be kept blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.”

Scriptures like these give us a glimpse of what biblical wholeheartedness could look like.

Sincere devotion is just simply devotion when not integrated with authenticity. Free from all reserve and hesitation is not possible without inward transformation. Is it? It’s as though, it’s a “this must proceed that”. To live wholeheartedly, we must be wholehearted. Rather to live and be wholehearted, we must welcome and invite the transformation of becoming wholehearted.

I think of people like Paul, Naomi, Ruth, Esther, Mary, Peter, Moses, Abraham, and David. And so, so many more. Men and women who lived their lives fully devoted to Christ, not through perfection, but rather through brokenness and mess. These people were a hot mess. Much like you and me. 

But in all of their hot mess, they devoted everything to Christ and the people around them - in vulnerability and in passion. 

God calls us to community and impact. Yet, we certainly cannot make a fully loving impact when we are withholding and withdrawing from others. Whether it be out of fear or insecurity, whether we are fully convinced we are not good enough - or simply uncertain about our purpose. I truly believe God calls us to live vulnerably and authentically as we passionately live out our purpose for Him and through Him. We do this in community with God and others. 

To be wholehearted, to live wholehearted - we must be made whole. Don’t misunderstand, by no means do I mean we must be perfect. Perfection is not our aim. Scripture states in Matthew 5:48, "be Holy as I am Holy" or "be perfect as I am perfect". Can we really achieve the holiness or perfection of God? No. If we look at the context and meaning of this word “perfect” - the original word is “teleioi” in the Greek which translates as “completeness (fully grown)” in your understanding or in your thinking. Be made whole or undivided.  

God is made up of three parts, Father, Son, Holy Spirit - yet operates as a whole; much the same, according to scripture, we are made up of three parts - body, soul, spirit. 

And, God calls us to wholeness. How can that be expressed, lived out?

For our specific purposes, we are looking at the question of how can I be made whole - how can I live out wholeheartedness? How can I be transformed wholly and completely in Christ?

So often, we allow transformation in the external parts of our lives. We change our habits, we adjust our schedules and diets, we talk better, act better, perform better. Nonetheless, we feel broken - fragmented. Pieces of ourselves remain hidden and unseen both to the community around us, but most sadly to the God who created us. 

We live fragmented lives. We withdraw and protect - and it is not just from community. We do this from God, himself.

It seems silly, I know. How do you hide and withdraw from God who knows and sees all? It’s the beautiful and yet, treacherous act of free will and choice. He will not force himself on us, but He waits patiently for us to open our WHOLE heart to Him - to allow Him to transform us completely and wholly - and to surrender wholeheartedly in our journey with HIm. IF we were to do this, it would change us from the inside out - and as we are changed from the inside out the overflow will be to live fully and authentically with God AND with OTHERS. Living wholeheartedly in community with God and others. 

What would happen in our families, neighborhoods, churches, and workplace if we were to allow wholehearted transformation that flows into wholehearted community?

This is what we hope to look at, focus on, and discover in 2018 with this community of women. Are you in? Are you “wholeheartedly” in? This means we will be committed to sharing our stories. It means we will be vulnerable and honest. And, we will work out our salvation through the gut-wrenching act of God reaching deep inside of us and revealing all of the ways we are broken and fragmented.

We will watch in awe as Christ works transformation in the deepest recesses of our soul and spirit, and reveals a beautiful outward life of wholehearted surrender and devotion. We will rejoice and celebrate as we journey towards the beautiful reward of a wholehearted life. We invite you to join us!

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...written by Christan Causey